Carroña – Javier Pérez

 

“I like dealing with points of encounter between spirit and flesh, between purity and impurity, between beauty and horror, between attraction and repulsion. I frequently use these swinging movements to offer onlookers different degrees of appreciation of my works. My works seek to reconcile all these aspects. I am interested in revealing how ambiguous these concepts are, and how reversible they can be. The idea is to confront humanity with its own condition, and for everything that humanity find frightening to take an irresistible charm. The idea is for humanity to be attracted by its own viscera.” – Javier Pérez.

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Javier Pérez was born in Bilbao in 1968.  He lives and works in Barcelona. His work is permeated by a strong symbolism and accompanied by an intense use of metaphor.The artist’s favorite subjects for addressing the impermanence and cyclic nature of life are the body and time. Works such asMutaciones (2004), a mixed media installation exhibited at the Palacio de Cristal in Madrid, or Tempus fugit (2002) emphasize the inexorable passage of time and the inevitable traces that it leaves on the body from a biological but, above all, from an existential point of view. To create his art, Pérez uses strong, often antithetical means of communication like horse hair and polyester, silkworm cocoons and ceramics, or cattle intestines and blown glass.

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